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Severn Sound Environmental Association

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​INVASIVE SPECIES

ALIENS AMONG US:

There is a growing concern with alien (non-native) invasive species and the impacts they can have – and there is good reason to be concerned.

Invasive alien species are a serious problem. Too often, a species becomes well established before we realize how much of a problem it can be. Learning more about these alien species can help in management, as well as improve early detection and rapid response to new invaders.

There are many types of invasive species, including plants, animals, and micro-organisms. An invasive species is often defined on the basis of negatively impacting the environment and native species, the economy and/or society (e.g., human health). The problem of invasive species is complex – there are lots of species, many different pathways for them to become established, and they can’t all be controlled in the same way.

An invasive species is something outside its normal range, due to accidental or purposeful introduction. Some examples of unintentional introduction of invasive species include: weed seeds mixed in with imported soil or crop seeds, and insects, disease or fungus that are present as hitchhikers on imported materials. In other cases, species are introduced intentionally, as agricultural crops, landscape plants, ornamentals, or plants for medicine and research.

Not all non-native species are invasive. Typically, an alien species becomes invasive because of a lack of natural controls (e.g., predators or disease) that would be present in their home range to keep the population in check. Without these natural controls, invasive species have a competitive edge over native species, and become a problem through rapid spread and increase in numbers.

  • Learn to identify invasive alien species and share your knowledge
  • Prevention is crucial - eradication is costly and challenging
  • Do not dump yard waste or garden plants in the wild. Follow Best Management Practices for gardening:
  • Do not dump aquariums or release baitfish from one water body into another - it’s illegal
  • Clean boats/equipment before moving from one water body to another
  • Don’t move firewood: buy it where you burn it! Moving wood from restricted areas can result in substantial fines and/or prosecution.
  • Report sightings of invasive species at www.eddmaps.org/ontario or call the Invading Species Hotline at 1-800-563-7711
  • Take action to reduce impacts of invasive species, participate in local invasive alien species control/management activities
  • Dispose of invasive species properly to avoid contaminating other areas

LEARN MORE:Phragmites in Hogg Bay, Victoria Harbour

General information

 Invasive Plants/Algae

COMMON / EUROPEAN BUCKTHORN

COMMON REED

Common Reed (Phragmites australis ssp. australis) – see Phragmites

CURLYLEAF PONDWEED

Curlyleaf Pondweed (Potamogeton crispus)

  • Ontario Invading Species Awareness Program: Curlyleaf Pondweed Watch Card

DOG-STRANGLING VINE

DIDYMO / ROCK SNOT

Didymo / Rock Snot (Didymosphenia geminata)

Michigan Invasive Species

ENGLISH IVY

EURASIAN WATER-MILFOIL

EUROPEAN BLACK ALDER

EUROPEAN FROG-BIT

EUROPEAN WATER CHESTNUT

FANWORT

GARLIC MUSTARD

GIANT HOGWEED

GLOSSY BUCKTHORN

GOUTWEED

HIMALAYAN BALSAM/ POLICEMAN’S HELMET/ PINK JEWELWEED

Himalayan Balsam/ Policeman's Helmet/ Pink Jewelweed (Impatiens glandulifera)

 

HONEYSUCKLES

HYDRILLA

JAPANESE BARBERRY

JAPANESE KNOTWEED

JAPANESE STILT GRASS

KUDZU

MISCANTHUS

Miscanthus (Miscanthus sinensis and Miscanthus sacchariflorus)

​Miscanthus (Miscanthus sinensis and Miscanthus sacchariflorus) 

PARROTFEATHER

PERIWINKLE

PHRAGMITES/ COMMON REED

Phragmites/ Common Reed (Phragmites australis ssp. australis)

 

PINK JEWELWEED

Pink Jewelweed (Impatiens glandulifera) – see Himalayan Balsam

POLICEMAN’S HELMET

Policeman's Helmet (Impatiens glandulifera) – see Himalayan Balsam

PURPLE LOOSESTRIFE

REED CANARY GRASS

Reed Canary Grass (Phalaris arundinacea subsp. arundinacea)

ROCK SNOT

Rock Snot (Didymosphenia geminata) – see Didymo

WATER HYACINTH

WATER LETTUCE

WATER SOLDIER

WHITE SWEET CLOVER

WILD CHERVIL

WILD PARSNIP

WINGED EUONYMUS

YELLOW FLOATING HEART

YELLOW IRIS

 Invasive - Animals/Microorganisms

*** FISH ***

​Invasive Fish Category

ASIAN CARPS - BIGHEAD CARP, BLACK CARP, GRASS CARP, SILVER CARP

Asian Carps - Bighead Carp, Black Carp, Grass Carp, Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, Mylopharyngodon piceus, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix)

BIGHEAD CARP

Bighead Carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) – see Asian Carps

BLACK CARP

Black Carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) – see Asian Carps

EURASIAN RUFFE

Eurasian Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) – see Ruffe

GRASS CARP

Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) – see Asian Carps

GOLDFISH

NORTHERN SNAKEHEAD

RAINBOW SMELT

ROUND GOBY

RUDD

RUFFE / EURASIAN RUFFE

SEA LAMPREY

SILVER CARP

Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) – see Asian Carps

TENCH

TUBE-NOSED GOBY

*** INSECTS, INVERTEBRATES & FUNGI ***

​Invasive Insects, Invertebrates and Fungi Category

ASIAN LONG-HORNED BEETLE

Asian Long-horned Beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)

Report signs and symptoms of trees infested with Asian Long-horned Beetle to the CFIA (phone 1-800-442-2342 or online at www.inspection.gc.ca) or contact the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry at 1-800-667-1940

ASIAN CLAM

BANDED MYSTERY SNAIL

Banded Mystery Snail (Viviparus georgianus)  – see Invasive Snails

BEECH BARK DISEASE

BEECH LEAF-MINING WEEVIL

Beech Leaf-mining Weevil (Orchestes fagi)

BLOODY RED SHRIMP

BROWN SPRUCE LONG-HORNED BEETLE

Brown Spruce Long-horned Beetle (Tetropium fuscum)

BUTTERNUT CANKER

CHANNELED APPLE SNAIL

Channeled Apple Snail (Pomacea canaliculata) – see Invasive Snails

CHINESE MYSTERY SNAIL

Chinese Mystery Snail (Cipangopaludina chinensis/ Bellamya chinensis) – see Invasive Snails

DUTCH ELM DISEASE

EARTHWORMS

EMERALD ASH BORER

Emerald Ash Borer (Argrilus planipennis)

  • Report signs and symptoms of trees infested with Emerald Ash Borer to the CFIA (phone 1-800-442-2342 or online at www.inspection.gc.ca), or contact the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (1-800-667-1940)

EUROPEAN SPRUCE BARK BEETLE

European Spruce Bark Beetle (Ips typographus)

FISHHOOK WATERFLEA

Fishhook Waterflea (Cercopagis pengoi) – see Spiny Waterflea & Fishhook Waterflea

GYPSY MOTH

HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae)

INVASIVE SNAILS

JAPANESE BEETLE

JAPANESE MYSTERY SNAIL

Japanese Mystery Snail (Cipangopaludina japonica) – see Invasive Snails

MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE

MYSTERY SNAIL

Mystery Snail – see Invasive Snails

NEW ZEALAND MUD SNAIL

New Zealand Mud Snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) – see Invasive Snails

OAK WILT

QUAGGA MUSSELS

Quagga Mussels (Dreissena bugensis) – see Zebra Mussels & Quagga Mussels

RUSTY CRAYFISH

SPINY WATERFLEA & FISHHOOK WATERFLEA

THOUSAND CANKER DISEASE

WHITE-NOSE SYNDROME IN BATS

White-nose Syndrome in Bats

Report unusual bat activity (e.g., flying outside in the daytime) or deaths to the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre (1-866-673-4781) or the Natural Resources Information Centre (1-800-667-1940 TTY for the hearing impaired at 1-866-686-6072).

ZEBRA MUSSELS & QUAGGA MUSSELS

Zebra Mussels & Quagga Mussels (Dreissena polymorpha & Dreissena bugensis)